Dragonfly Coalition

Dragonfly Coalition – Final – 062416
Have you ever asked yourself what you would do to change the world if money was no object?

There have been many, many opportunities for me to ponder that very question over the past couple of years or so as Spirit has brought me through a journey of witnessing homelessness up close and personal here in Orange County.

With every window into every aspect of the homeless dilemma, Spirit has shown me needed remedies, shown me how they are all connected together and how they form an inter-related system of enhanced prosperity flowing into and throughout the community.

When we commit to sharing with our brothers and sisters from a frequency of compassion and benevolence, a wellspring of plenty enough arises out of the field that is generated from our group intention.

Kryon – an authority I draw from as I bring this work, the Dragonfly Coalition, forth into reality, and who is quoted at length in my report to the City and Neighbors of Costa Mesa available through download at the link here in this post – Kryon describes how there is a form of energy available on our planet now that is activated by the application of compassion, how this energy becomes a catalyst when compassion is used and how every endeavor that chooses its policies and practices from a place of compassion will inevitably succeed.

This energy is available now where it was not available previously.

If this is true as I believe it to be, this suggests that the converse of that reality is also true. When compassion is withheld in our deliberations and from the choices we make, our endeavors will inevitably fail…which pretty well describes what I’ve seen over the past months since I returned to Costa Mesa last July, nearly a year ago now.

I have been witness to the impact being deeply in debt has on a town, such that servicing that debt (some $3.7Million a year) has required layoffs of City employees, particularly those employees who used to maintain the parks.

As I toured Lion’s Park one recent Saturday afternoon to count the number of parking spaces around the perimeter and TO SEE IF THEY HAVE YET REMOVED THE PADLOCKS FROM THE LAVATORIES IN LION’S PARK (No, they have not), I found it odd that nearly the whole ten acres of the park, the sports field, the recreation center, the grassy areas, the gardens – all were abandoned except for a few homeless people lying about – the whole park was lying fallow, unused on a Saturday afternoon.

In my examination of:
1) Costa Mesa’s preliminary budget for 2017,
2) the Draft General Plan under discussion for approval at present and within which there is absolutely no mention of any remedies whatsoever to address homelessness, nor to preserve irreplaceable open spaces in Costa Mesa
3) reports of increasing crime in the neighborhoods,
4) the evidence of more and more homeless people scratching for a place to sleep, to be…
…in my examination I’ve observed a town that is failing to sustain itself sufficiently in its present circumstances – which is pretty much how anyone gets to be homeless, by failing to sustain themselves in the circumstances they find themselves at present…true?

But this is a municipality, one which is quite unprepared for, indeed rather befuddled by the larger and larger influx of homeless people being drawn into this vacuum of energetic befuddlement… people who are also unable to sustain themselves, whose bereft lives mirror the complete absence of compassion from the community in its response to their presence.

Who are these homeless people? Long before the Sober Living Homes ever became an issue of concern, the homeless were already proliferating:
1) Far too many of them are seniors left behind after new development neglected to include provisions for their suitable and sustainable replacement housing when their modest but affordable apartments were torn down and replaced by condos or apartment units way beyond their means, and so who are now scraping by in unimaginable ways.
— Think of your grandmother or your great-grandmother living out of her truck, if she’s fortunate enough to have one, finding a circuit of places that will allow her to use the bathroom, prowling around at night to find a place where she can park to sleep overnight in a town that forbids sleeping in your vehicle – the same town that approved the new development projects that displaced her out of the last remaining abode in her life. It is more commonplace than you can even fathom.
2) Many are seniors who were entering their 60’s when the 2008 recession hit and whose careers abruptly dissolved beneath them…beneath us.
— My own last career job ended in 2008 and I turned 60 that year.
— A very dear friend of mine now well into his 80’s lost his wife of 40+ years to liver disease, his 20 year business to bankruptcy, and his home of 35 years to foreclosure all in the same year.
3) Any number of the millions of faces only tangentially alluded to in the recent film The Big Short. The story told in that film was no dark fantasy; it was all too very real for millions of seniors especially whose time to recover from the devastation had run out. Many of the fallout from that one fraudulent playbook are now homeless or nearly so, roaming the parks, the neighborhoods, the streets, the parking lots looking for a place to be, to sleep, to take care of themselves, some way to sustain themselves in a world completely devoid of any kind of compassionate regard for their plight.
4) So many of the homeless are disabled in one way or another and would qualify for public assistance if they had someone to advocate for them by researching and navigating all the systems that form such a huge barrier to entry for those without the capacity to do it on their own.

The report you’ll find embedded for download in this post proposes a comprehensive set of remedies for the problems brought about by the issue of unmitigated homelessness in Costa Mesa. These remedies include practical measures that will alleviate the misery of the most critically and chronically bereft, as well as curb the need for most of the homeless invasions into the neighborhoods.

Also described in this report is my discovery of a new, heretofore unclaimed source of revenue for the City. The definers of the Transient Occupancy Tax back in 2004 had no inkling of the Sober Living Homes that would come into being nearly a decade later, but wisely, the characteristics of the SLH’s were included in those early descriptions and expanded upon since in later ordinances.

Apparently no one has put the two together before now and assessed the Transient Occupancy Tax on the operators of these transient-sheltering facilities…that is just one of the gifts that have emerged from my studies while writing this business plan.

As time and funding permit, this blog CommunityWellspring.com will host a forum where issues can be discussed at length, and it will become a clearinghouse for information about related emerging technologies and social experiments being carried out in this new energy, in these new times.

For now, the links to prognosticators’ viewpoints about how the Brexit event relates to these issues are provided for the curious reader’s further deliberations, while I now turn my full attention to writing the rest of the Dragonfly Coalition Business Plan and getting it turned into the cue at Humanus.ca.

After completing the business plan – the attached project plan being the core of the overall plan – and sending it on to Humanus, the long term prospects for actually receiving funding for the Dragonfly Coalition Project are promising.

Though each person has to discern for themselves the validity of the opportunity I’m pointing to, I’ve been close enough to it and followed it long enough to discern it to be legitimate and so am following my own trusted inner guidance as I proceed to bring forth this set of remedies to our town, to our world…and to describe the vision coming through me of how it all shall be carried out.

If you hold resonance with any of what you read here, your support through PayPal (shining_britely@yahoo.com) is both welcome and necessary. Like everyone who is so blessed to have a home, the rent and utilities are due. This venture into the affairs of and remedies for the City and Neighbors of Costa Mesa has been a labor of love, to be sure; however it is not yet self-sustaining for even the near term.

I am deeply grateful for all your support. Thank you.

Many blessings and radiant light upon your way,

Linda Witt-King
July 1, 2016